Interventions for disorder and severe intoxication in and around licensed premises, 1989–2009

Authors

  • Iain Brennan,

    1. Department of Social Sciences, University of Hull, Hull, UK
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  • Simon C. Moore,

    Corresponding author
    1. Violence and Society Research Group, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
      Simon C. Moore, Violence and Society Research Group, Applied Clinical Research and Public Health, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF 14 4XY, UK. E-mail: mooresc2@cardiff.ac.uk
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  • Ellie Byrne,

    1. Cardiff Institute for Society and Health, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
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  • Simon Murphy

    1. Cardiff Institute for Society and Health, School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK
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Simon C. Moore, Violence and Society Research Group, Applied Clinical Research and Public Health, School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF 14 4XY, UK. E-mail: mooresc2@cardiff.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Aims  To systematically review rigorous evaluation studies into the effectiveness of interventions in and around licensed premises that aimed to reduce severe intoxication and disorder.

Methods  A systematic search was conducted. Papers that rigorously evaluated interventions based in and around licensed premises to reduce disorder or intoxication were included.

Results  Fifteen studies were identified, three randomized controlled trials and 12 non-randomized quasi-experimental evaluations. Outcome measures were intoxication (n = 6), disorder (n = 6) and intoxication and disorder (n = 3). Interventions included responsible beverage service training (n = 5), server violence prevention training (n = 1), enhanced enforcement of licensing regulations (n = 1), multi-level interventions (n = 5), licensee accords (n = 2) and a risk-focused consultation (n = 1). Intervention effects varied, even across studies using similar interventions.

Conclusions  Server training courses that are designed to reduce disorder have some potential, although there is a lack of evidence to support their use to reduce intoxication and the evidence base is weak.

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