Who is most susceptible to movie smoking effects? Exploring the impacts of race and socio-economic status

Authors

  • Samir Soneji,

    1. Cancer Control Research Program, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA
    2. The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Valerie A. Lewis,

    1. The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Susanne Tanski,

    1. Cancer Control Research Program, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • James D. Sargent

    Corresponding author
    1. The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA
    • Cancer Control Research Program, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence to: James D. Sargent, Cancer Control Research Program, Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, NH 03756, USA. E-mail: james.d.sargent@dartmouth.edu

Abstract

Aims

This study assesses how race/ethnicity and socio-economic status modify the relationship between exposure to movie smoking and having tried smoking in adolescents.

Design

Data come from a cross-sectional telephone survey and were analyzed using logistic regression models. A respondent reporting ever having tried smoking was regressed on exposure to movie smoking, race, socio-economic status, the interactions of these variables and family and background characteristics.

Setting

National sample of US adolescents.

Participants

A total of 3653 respondents aged 13–18 years.

Measurements

Outcome was if subjects reported ever having tried smoking. Movie smoking exposure was assessed through respondents' reporting having watched a set of movie titles, which were coded for smoking instances.

Findings

The proportion having tried smoking was lower for blacks (32%) compared to Hispanics (41%) and whites (38%). The relationship between movie smoking and having tried smoking varied by race/ethnicity. Among whites and Hispanics exposure to movie smoking positively predicted smoking behavior, but movie smoking had no impact on blacks. Socio-economic status further modified the relation among whites; high socio-economic status white adolescents were more susceptible to movie smoking than low socio-economic status white adolescents.

Conclusions

Exposure to movie smoking is not experienced uniformly as a risk factor for having ever tried smoking among US adolescents. Whites and Hispanics are more likely to try smoking as a function of increased exposure to movie smoking. In addition, higher socio-economic status increases susceptibility to movie smoking among whites. Youth with fewer risk factors may be more influenced by media messages on smoking.

Ancillary