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Keywords:

  • Cessation;
  • inequalities;
  • prospective cohort study;
  • smokeless tobacco;
  • South Asians

Abstract

Aim

To evaluate smokeless tobacco cessation in communities of South Asian origin.

Design

Multi-centre prospective cohort study.

Setting

Three tobacco cessation services offering specialist smokeless tobacco cessation outreach clinic support to South Asians (Bangladeshi, Indian and Pakistani) resident in England.

Participants

A total of 239 South Asian participants seeking to stop smokeless tobacco use between November 2010 and December 2011.

Measurements

Socio-demographics, tobacco use and dependence, self-reported abstinence at 4 weeks and satisfaction measures.

Findings

Participants' mean age was 45 [standard deviation (SD) = 13] years, were predominantly female (76%), of Bangladeshi origin (74%), either home carers (53%) or not working (29%). Sixty-three per cent were recruited from community locations, 21% through a clinical contact and 16% through friends and family. Mean daily number of smokeless tobacco intakes was 10 (SD = 7) and the mean dependence score was 4.5 (SD = 1.9). Sixty-three per cent of participants achieved continuous abstinence 4 weeks after quitting. Using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) versus not using it [OR = 3.47, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 9.62] and below median (≤8) daily smokeless tobacco intakes (OR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.40) predicted successful abstinence.

Conclusion

South Asian smokeless tobacco users resident in England accessing services to help them stop appear to have short-term success rates comparable with smokers attending stop-smoking services, with higher success rates being reported by those using nicotine replacement therapy.