Get access

Coronatine and salicylic acid: the battle between Arabidopsis and Pseudomonas for phytohormone control

Authors

  • ANNA BLOCK,

    1. Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Horticultural Sciences Department, PO Box 110690, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • ERIC SCHMELZ,

    1. United States Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service, Center for Medical Agricultural & Veterinary Entomology, 1700 SW 23rd Drive, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • JEFFREY B. JONES,

    1. Department of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0680, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • HARRY J. KLEE

    Corresponding author
    1. Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, Horticultural Sciences Department, PO Box 110690, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence: Tel.: +1 352 3928249; fax: +1 352 8462063; e-mail: hjklee@ifas.ufl.edu

SUMMARY

The phytotoxin coronatine is a jasmonate mimic produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). Coronatine acts as a virulence factor in Arabidopsis and mutants insensitive to coronatine are resistant to Pst and have higher levels of salicylic acid (SA). In this work we used the SA-deficient lines NahG and sid2-2 to determine if coronatine acts directly as a virulence factor or indirectly by SA suppression. Using coronatine-deficient Pst mutants we demonstrated that the lack of coronatine compromises Pst virulence in both wild-type and SA-deficient Arabidopsis. Thus, the action of coronatine is not due to SA suppression. Rather, SA-independent jasmonate-responses are the most likely mechanism for its action.

Ancillary