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Plasmodiophora brassicae: a review of an emerging pathogen of the Canadian canola (Brassica napus) crop

Authors


Email: sheau-fang.hwang@gov.ab.ca

SUMMARY

Plasmodiophora brassicae causes clubroot disease in cruciferous plants, and is an emerging threat to Canadian canola (Brassica napus) production. This review focuses on recent studies into the pathogenic diversity of P. brassicae populations, mechanisms of pathogenesis and resistance, and the development of diagnostic tests for pathogen detection and quantification.

Taxonomy:Plasmodiophora brassicae is a soil-borne, obligate parasite within the class Phytomyxea (plasmodiophorids) of the protist supergroup Rhizaria.

Disease symptoms: Clubroot development is characterized by the formation of club-shaped galls on the roots of affected plants. Above-ground symptoms include wilting, stunting, yellowing and premature senescence.

Disease cycle:Plasmodiophora brassicae first infects the root hairs, producing motile zoospores that invade the cortical tissue. Secondary plasmodia form within the root cortex and, by triggering the expression of genes involved in the production of auxins, cytokinins and other plant growth regulators, divert a substantial proportion of plant resources into hypertrophic growth of the root tissues, resulting in the formation of galls. The secondary plasmodia are cleaved into millions of resting spores and the root galls quickly disintegrate, releasing long-lived resting spores into the soil. A serine protease, PRO1, has been shown to trigger resting spore germination.

Physiological specialization: Physiological specialization occurs in populations of P. brassicae, and various host differential sets, consisting of different collections of Brassica genotypes, are used to distinguish among pathotypes of the parasite.

Detection and quantification: As P. brassicae cannot be cultured, bioassays with bait plants were traditionally used to detect the pathogen in the soil. More recent innovations for the detection and quantification of P. brassicae include the use of antibodies, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and qPCR in conjunction with signature fatty acid analysis, all of which are more sensitive than bioassays.

Resistance in canola: Clubroot-resistant canola hybrids, recently introduced into the Canadian market, represent an important new tool for clubroot management in this crop. Genetic resistance must be carefully managed, however, as it has been quickly overcome in other regions. At least three resistance genes and one or two quantitative trait loci are involved in conferring resistance to P. brassicae. Root hair infection still occurs in resistant cultivars, but secondary plasmodia often remain immature and unable to produce resting spores. Fewer cell wall breakages occur in resistant hosts, and spread of the plasmodium through cortical tissue is restricted. More information on the genetics of clubroot resistance in canola is needed to ensure more effective resistance stewardship.

Useful websites:http://www.canolacouncil.org/clubroot/resources.aspx, http://tu-dresden.de/die_tu_dresden/fakultaeten/fakultaet_mathematik_und_naturwissenschaften/fachrichtung_biologie/botanik/pflanzenphysiologie/clubroot, http://www.ohio.edu/people/braselto/plasmos/

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