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Deworming efficacy of Albizia anthelmintica in Uganda: preliminary findings

Authors

  • Jeanne T. Gradé,

    Corresponding author
    1. Christian Veterinary Mission, PO Box 2203 Jinja, Uganda and Karamoja Christian Ethnoveterinary Program, PO Box 22 Moroto, Uganda
    2. Laboratory of Tropical and Subtropical Agronomy and Ethnobotany, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 653 Coupure links (Ghent University), B-9000 Gent, Belgium
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  • John R. S. Tabuti,

    1. Department of Botany, Makerere University, PO Box 7062 Kampala, Uganda
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  • Patrick Van Damme,

    1. Laboratory of Tropical and Subtropical Agronomy and Ethnobotany, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, 653 Coupure links (Ghent University), B-9000 Gent, Belgium
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  • Bennett L. Arble

    1. School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, 2015 Linden Drive Madison, WI 53706, U.S.A.
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  • All authors declare no conflicts of interest

*E-mail: jeangrade@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the anthelmintic effectiveness of Albizia anthelmintica, as a first step in investigating the hypothesis that livestock self-medicate. In July 2006, an observational study was conducted with 56 young female lambs, to validate A. anthelmintica efficacy. Faecal egg per gram for Coccidia, Strongyle-type, Monezia, Strongyloides and Dicrocoelia eggs were counted and analysed. Results indicate that A. anthelmintica is effective in controlling infection with a variety of internal parasites in lambs, Monezia was the most sensitive. Furthermore, treatment of Strongyle-type worms requires a biweekly dose of A. anthelmintica as an effective deworming protocol.

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