How do differences in species and part consumption affect diet nutrient concentrations? A test with red colobus monkeys in Kibale National Park, Uganda

Authors

  • Amy M. Ryan,

    1. Department of Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York City, NY, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Colin A. Chapman,

    1. Department of Anthropology, and McGill School of Environment, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    2. Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York, NY, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jessica M. Rothman

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anthropology, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York City, NY, U.S.A
    2. New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology (NYCEP), New York City, NY, U.S.A
    • Department of Psychology, Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York City, NY, U.S.A
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence: E-mail: jessica.rothman@hunter.cuny.edu

Abstract

Within a primate species, diet can be highly variable in composition, even at small spatial scales within the same forest, or temporally, suggesting that primates use different plant species and parts to meet similar nutritional needs. To test whether such differences in the plant species and parts that primates eat affects the nutrient concentrations that they obtain, we observed feeding of seven groups of red colobus monkeys ( Procolobus rufomitratus) residing in Kibale National Park, Uganda. The different groups consumed mostly young leaves from many of the same plant species, but spent different amounts of time feeding on them. As protein and fibre are suggested to be important determinants of colobine food choice and abundance, we analysed multiple samples of 47 food species for protein and fibre. Despite the differences in the plant species and parts eaten, the protein and fibre concentrations for the seven red colobus groups were similar. Our results suggest that colobus monkeys eating diets with differing amounts of species and parts may ultimately receive similar concentrations of nutrients.

Résumé

Au sein d'une même espèce de primate, la composition du régime alimentaire peut être très variable, même à petite échelle spatiale, dans la même forêt, ou temporelle, ce qui laisse entendre que les primates utilisent des espèces et des parties de plantes différentes pour satisfaire des besoins nutritionnels semblables. Pour vérifier si de telles différences d'espèces végétales et de parties de plantes consommées par les primates affectent les concentrations de nutriments obtenues, nous avons observé l'alimentation de sept groupes de colobes roux ( Procolobus rufomitratus) résidant dans le Parc National de Kibale, en Ouganda. Les différents groupes consommaient principalement de jeunes feuilles de nombreuses plantes des mêmes espèces, mais ils passaient une durée différente à s'en nourrir. Comme les protéines et les fibres sont censées être des déterminants importants dans le choix et l'abondance de la nourriture des colobes, nous avons analysé le contenu en protéines et en fibres de multiples échantillons de 47 espèces consommées. Malgré les différences d'espèces et de parties de plantes consommées, les concentrations de protéines et de fibres étaient semblables pour les sept groupes de colobes rouges. Nos résultats suggèrent que les régimes alimentaires des colobes, qui diffèrent quant au nombre d'espèces et aux parties de plantes qui les composent, pourraient tout compte fait contenir des concentrations de nutriments semblables.

Ancillary