Sub-optimal proton pump inhibitor dosing is prevalent in patients with poorly controlled gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

Authors


Dr N. T. Gunaratnam, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, St Joseph Mercy Hospital, Huron Gastro, 5300 Elliott Drive, Ypsilanti, MI 48197, USA.
E-mail: gunaratnamn@hurongastro.com

Abstract

Summary

Background

Proton pump inhibitors are the most potent drug treatment for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Premeal dosing maximizes efficacy while sub-optimal dose timing may limit efficacy.

Aim

To determine the prevalence of sub-optimal proton pump inhibitor dosing in a community-based gastro-oesophageal reflux disease population.

Materials and methods

One hundred patients on proton pump inhibitors referred for persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease symptoms were questioned about their proton pump inhibitor dosing habits and classified as optimal or sub-optimal dosers. Optimal dosers took proton pump inhibitors with or up to 60 min before meals. Sub-optimal dosers took proton pump inhibitors >60 min before meals, after meals, as needed, or at bedtime.

Results

Forty-six percent dosed optimally. Fifty-four percent dosed sub-optimally with 21 of 54 (39%) dosing >60 min before meals, 16 (30%) after meals, 15 (28%) at bedtime and two (4%) as needed. Only 6% of the subjects on once-daily proton pump inhibitor regimens and 33% of subjects taking proton pump inhibitors two- to three times daily dosed in a manner that maximized acid suppression (15–30 min before a meal).

Conclusions

In this study, 54% of patients dosed proton pump inhibitors sub-optimally and only 12% dosed in a manner that maximized acid suppression. As sub-optimal proton pump inhibitor dose timing can limit efficacy, patients with refractory symptoms should be asked about dose timing to avoid inappropriate and costly dose escalations.

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