Effects of spray-dried blood cell meal with microencapsulated methionine substituting fish meal on the growth, nutrient digestibility and amino acid retention of Litopenaeus vannamei

Authors

  • Huaxin Niu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China
    2. School of Animal Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao, China
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  • Jie Chang,

    1. School of Animal Science and Technology, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao, China
    2. The Key Laboratory of Mariculture (Ministry of Education), Ocean University of China, Qingdao, China
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  • Shidong Guo,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China
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  • Zhongguo Xie,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China
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  • Aixia Zhu

    1. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China
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Correspondence: S Guo, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, 1800, Lihu Road, Wuxi, 214122 Jiangsu, China. E-mail: guosd@jiangnan.edu.cn

Abstract

The effect of substitution of fish meal (FM) by spray-dried blood cell meal (SBCM) with microencapsulated dl-methionine supplementation in trial diets for Litopenaeus vannamei was evaluated. Six isonitrogenous (320 g kg−1) and isolipidic (85 g kg−1) diets were formulated to feed shrimp (2.3±0.2 g shrimp−1) for 56 days. Shrimp were fed with six diets in which FM protein was gradually replaced by SBCM protein (0%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% in diets 0–5). Growth performances and feed utilization of shrimp fed diets containing 0%, 3.5%, 7.0% and 10.5% SBCM protein were not significantly different (P>0.05). Growth, feed conversion ratio and protein efficiency ratio of shrimp fed diets (80 and 100% FM substitution) were significantly poorer compared with other treatments (P<0.05). With increased levels of dietary SBCM, apparent digestibility coefficient of dry matter, crude protein enhanced from 76.9% to 82.3%, 84.8% to 89.0%, but crude lipid decreased from 90.6% to 88.3% respectively. The carcass composition values were not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the replacement level of FM, except lipid. There were no significantly differences (P>0.05) in amino acid retentions among Diets 0–3. The results suggest that the dietary FM protein could efficiently be substituted by SBCM up to 60%, without adverse effects on the growth of L. vannamei.

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