Evaluation of cold-pressed flaxseed oil as an alternative dietary lipid source for juvenile sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria)

Authors

  • Erin N. Friesen,

    Corresponding author
    • Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Food, Nutrition and Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Shannon K. Balfry,

    1. Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Food, Nutrition and Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
    2. Department of Fisheries and Oceans, University of British Columbia, Centre for Aquaculture and Environmental Research, West Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Brent J. Skura,

    1. Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Food, Nutrition and Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
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  • Michael G. Ikonomou,

    1. Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, BC, Canada
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  • Dave A. Higgs

    1. Department of Fisheries and Oceans, University of British Columbia, Centre for Aquaculture and Environmental Research, West Vancouver, BC, Canada
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Correspondence: E.N. Friesen, Faculty of Land and Food Systems, Food, Nutrition and Health, The University of British Columbia, 2205 East Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 Canada. E-mail: friesen.erin@gmail.com

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of using cold-pressed flaxseed oil (FO) as a major source of lipid in place of anchovy oil (AO) in the diet of juvenile sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria), a relatively new marine species to aquaculture. Sablefish were fed one of four diets twice daily to satiation for 15 weeks. The test diets were identical in composition, except for the source of supplemental lipid which was either 100% AO (100AO), or increasing replacement of AO with FO i.e., 75AO:25FO, 50AO:50 FO or 25AO:75FO. Sablefish growth parameters, whole body and fillet proximate constituent concentrations and apparent digestibility coefficients were uninfluenced by diet treatment. There were also no adverse effects of the diet treatments on fish health, as determined from analysis of various haematological and innate immunological parameters. Terminal fillet fatty acid compositions generally reflected the dietary fatty acid compositions, while flesh contaminant concentration decreased with increasing dietary flaxseed oil content. Results indicated that FO may comprise up to 75% of the supplemental lipid in a grower diet for sablefish, while still providing humans with a rich dietary source of highly unsaturated fatty acids.

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