Get access

Marine gammarids (Crustacea: Amphipoda): a new live prey to culture Octopus maya hatchlings

Authors

  • Elena Baeza-Rojano,

    Corresponding author
    • Laboratorio de Biología Marina, Dpto. Fisiología y Zoología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Pedro Domingues,

    1. Instituto Español de Oceanografía – Centro Oceanográfico de Vigo, Vigo, Spain
    Search for more papers by this author
  • José M Guerra-García,

    1. Laboratorio de Biología Marina, Dpto. Fisiología y Zoología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Santiago Capella,

    1. Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad de Química-Sisal, Sisal, Yucatán, México
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elsa Noreña-Barroso,

    1. Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad de Química-Sisal, Sisal, Yucatán, México
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Claudia Caamal-Monsreal,

    1. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Multidisciplinaria de Docencia e Investigación Puerto de abrigo s/n, Sisal, Yucatán, México
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Carlos Rosas

    1. Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Multidisciplinaria de Docencia e Investigación Puerto de abrigo s/n, Sisal, Yucatán, México
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence: E Baeza-Rojano, Laboratorio de Biología Marina, Dpto. Fisiología y Zoología, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes 6, 41012, Sevilla, Spain. E-mail: elenbae@us.es

Abstract

The effects of feeding two alternative live prey Hyalella azteca (freshwater gammarids) and Hyale media (marine gammarids) to Octopus maya hatchlings were compared with feeding adult Artemia sp., traditionally used during the first weeks of the life cycle. Hatchlings were fed ad libitum these three live preys during the first 15 days, and a paste elaborated with fresh squid and shrimp during the next 15 days when hatchling can be fed prepared diets. Weight (g) and specific growth rates (% day−1) were determined every 15 days. Octopus maya hatchlings fed with marine gammarids grew larger (6.9 ± 0.2% day−1) compared with hatchlings fed Artemia sp. or freshwater gammarids (4.8 ± 0.2% and 5.0 ± 0.3% day−1 respectively). Survival was also higher (92.2 ± 6.8%) for hatchlings fed marine gammarids, than for those fed Artemia sp. (74.5 ± 23.8%) or freshwater gammarids (41.2 ± 21.2%). The content of acylglycerides, cholesterol and proteins in O. maya fed marine gammarids suggested a better nutrient assimilation by the hatchlings. Also, polyunsaturated fatty acids levels (EPA and DHA) were more abundant in marine gammarids, possibly contributing to the higher growth rates observed. This is the first study revealing a successful use of marine gammarids as alternative prey for octopus hatchlings culture.

Ancillary