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Growth, food intake, protein retention and fatty acid profile in Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797) fed agglutinated moist diets containing fresh and dry raw materials based on aquaculture by-products

Authors

  • Juan Estefanell,

    Corresponding author
    1. Grupo de Investigación en Acuicultura (GIA), Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) & Instituto Universitario de Sanidad Animal y Seguridad Alimentaria (IUSA), Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
    • Correspondence: J Estefanell, Grupo de Investigación en Acuicultura (GIA), Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) & Instituto Universitario de Sanidad Animal y Seguridad Alimentaria (IUSA), PO Box 56, E-35200 Telde, Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain. E-mail: juan.estefanell@giaqua.org

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  • Juan Socorro,

    1. Grupo de Investigación en Acuicultura (GIA), Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) & Instituto Universitario de Sanidad Animal y Seguridad Alimentaria (IUSA), Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
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  • Marisol Izquierdo,

    1. Grupo de Investigación en Acuicultura (GIA), Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) & Instituto Universitario de Sanidad Animal y Seguridad Alimentaria (IUSA), Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
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  • Javier Roo

    1. Grupo de Investigación en Acuicultura (GIA), Instituto Canario de Ciencias Marinas (ICCM) & Instituto Universitario de Sanidad Animal y Seguridad Alimentaria (IUSA), Las Palmas, Canary Islands, Spain
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Abstract

The lack of specific compound diets for cephalopods is limiting the industrial development of some species. In this study, four agglutinated moist diets were tested in individually reared Octopus vulgaris (979 ± 151 g) for 8 weeks. All diets were based on bogue Boops boops, accidentally reared in fish farms (aquaculture by-product), and agglutinated with alginate and calcium. One diet was based exclusively on bogue fillets, two on bogue fillets complemented with meat from two crab species (Portunus pelagicus, Grapsus grapsus) and the last one on bogue and G. grapsus meals. As a control diet, bogue and P. pelagicus were supplied fresh on alternate days. All diets induced similar feed intake (2.1–2.6% day−1). However, the meal-based diet induced negative growth in comparison with the control and the other agglutinated diets (0.80–0.85% day−1). Higher lipid content in agglutinated diets (28–30% dw) in comparison with the control diet (16% dw) led to higher protein retention in muscle. These results underline the inadequacy of traditional meals in diets for cephalopods and that the inclusion of crab meat did not increase feeding rates and growth in O. vulgaris. The dietary fatty acid, with high levels of oleic and linoleic acid and low levels of ARA, clearly reflected in digestive gland, while only decreasing ARA and increasing EPA levels were observed in muscle, with no apparent negative effect on growth.

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