Repair of photoaged dermal matrix by topical application of a cosmetic ‘antiageing’ product

Authors

  • R.E.B. Watson,

    1. Dermatological Sciences Research Group, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, U.K.
      *The Boots Company, Nottingham NG2 3AA, U.K.
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  • S.P. Long,

    1. Dermatological Sciences Research Group, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, U.K.
      *The Boots Company, Nottingham NG2 3AA, U.K.
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  • J.J. Bowden,

    1. Dermatological Sciences Research Group, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, U.K.
      *The Boots Company, Nottingham NG2 3AA, U.K.
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  • J.Y. Bastrilles,

    1. Dermatological Sciences Research Group, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, U.K.
      *The Boots Company, Nottingham NG2 3AA, U.K.
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  • S.P. Barton,

    1. Dermatological Sciences Research Group, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, U.K.
      *The Boots Company, Nottingham NG2 3AA, U.K.
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  • C.E.M. Griffiths

    1. Dermatological Sciences Research Group, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, U.K.
      *The Boots Company, Nottingham NG2 3AA, U.K.
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  • Conflicts of interest
    S.P.L. and S.P.B. are employed by The Boots Company, the manufacturer of the three commercially available preparations tested in this study.

R.E.B. Watson.
E-mail: rachel.watson@manchester.ac.uk

Summary

Background  Photoaged skin is characterized by coarse and fine wrinkles. The mechanism of wrinkle formation appears to involve changes to components of the dermal extracellular matrix. Topical treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) can repair photoaged dermal matrix; this is regarded as the ‘gold standard’ against which repair agents are judged. To date, little is known regarding the ability of over-the-counter ‘antiageing’ products to repair photoaged skin.

Objectives  We used a modified occluded patch test to ascertain whether topical applications of cosmetic ‘antiageing’ products are able to repair photoaged human skin.

Methods  Commercially available test products [basic moisturizer, ‘antiageing’ cream containing different active complex levels (6% active: lipopentapeptide, white lupin peptides, antioxidants, retinyl palmitate; 2% active: lipopentapeptide, white lupin peptides, antioxidants)] were applied under occlusion for 12 days prior to biopsy and histological assessment in photoaged volunteers (= 9). RA was used as a positive control.

Results  In agreement with previous studies, the patch-test study revealed that RA produced significant fibrillin-1 deposition in the papillary dermis (< 0·01) but had little effect on procollagen I or matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression. The 6% total active complex formulation, however, increased the deposition of fibrillin-1 and procollagen I (< 0·01, < 0·05, respectively).

Conclusions  This study indicates that in an in vivo 12-day patch test an over-the-counter cosmetic product can induce changes in photoaged dermal extracellular matrix, which are indicative of repair.

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