Pre-existing root cementum may promote cementoblast differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells

Authors

  • A. Song,

    1. Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, China
    2. Shangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Shandong University, Jinan, China
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  • J. Cai,

    1. Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, China
    2. Jinan Stomalogic hospital, Jinan, China and Department of Stomatology, the Affiliated hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China
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  • K. Pan,

    1. Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, China
    2. Shangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Shandong University, Jinan, China
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  • P. Yang

    Corresponding author
    1. Shangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine, Shandong University, Jinan, China
    • Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, China
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Correspondence: P. Yang, Department of Periodontology, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan 250012 , Shandong Province, China. Tel.: 086-531-88382368; Fax: 086-531-88382923; E-mail: yangps@sdu.edu.cn

Abstract

Objectives

To observe whether preserved healthy cementum could promote differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells to cementoblasts.

Materials and methods

Symmetrical root slices from each healthy premolar were distributed into either the control group (cementum removed) or test group (cementum preserved). After isolation and characterization, human periodontal ligament cells were inoculated onto root slices for 7 days co-culture. Two slices per group were studied for cell morphology by scanning electronic microscopy. Twenty-three slices were detected for expression of cementum attachment protein and cementum protein 23, two putative cementoblast markers, by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Twenty slices were transplanted into nude mice and analysed using histology and immunohistochemistry for osteopontin and bone sialoprotein expression after 8 weeks.

Results

Cells of the test group had smoother fibroblast morphology and higher cementum protein 23 and cementum attachment protein expression than those of the control group (< 0.01). In the test group, 14 root slices revealed cementum-like matrix formation resting on old cementum; no splits were observed between newly formed matrix and old cementum. In the control group, 17 specimens had fibrous tissue formation along the root surface and varying width of splits could be seen between new fibrous tissue and dentine surface. Only three specimens demonstrated presence of newly formed thin cementum-like matrix. Newly formed cementum-like matrix was positive for osteopontin and bone sialoprotein.

Conclusions

The results demonstrate that healthy root cementum may promote differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells towards cementoblasts.

Ancillary