Clinical & Experimental Allergy

The relationship of a topic disease and immunoglobulin levels with special reference to selective IgA deficiency

Authors

  • C. COLLINS-WILLIAMS,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Allergy, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto; and Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
      Dr C. Collins-Williams, Chief, Division of Allergy, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto 101, Ontario, Canada.
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  • A. W. CHIU,

    1. Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Allergy, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto; and Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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  • E. A. VARGA

    1. Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Allergy, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto; and Department of Paediatrics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
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    • *

      875 Ouellette Avenue, Windsor, Ontario, Canada.


Dr C. Collins-Williams, Chief, Division of Allergy, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto 101, Ontario, Canada.

Summary

We have confirmed that the presence of IgE in selective IgA deficient patients does not give protection against increased susceptibility to infections. Atopic individuals with selective IgA deficiency may have higher levels of IgE than non-atopic individuals. Immunoglobulin levels for G, A or M tend to be lower in atopic individuals than in normal individuals.

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