Intranasal betamethasone valerate in the treatment of seasonal rhinitis

Authors

  • G. J. ARCHER,

    1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Leeds University (St James's) Hospital, Leeds Clinical Research Unit, Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, Greenford
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    • *

      Steppinghill Hospital, Stockport, Manchester.

  • A. K. THOMAS,

    1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Leeds University (St James's) Hospital, Leeds Clinical Research Unit, Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, Greenford
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  • S. M. HARDING

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Leeds University (St James's) Hospital, Leeds Clinical Research Unit, Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, Greenford
      Dr S. M. Harding, Clinical Research Unit, Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, Greenford, Middlesex UB6 0HE.
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Dr S. M. Harding, Clinical Research Unit, Glaxo Laboratories Ltd, Greenford, Middlesex UB6 0HE.

Summary

Betamethasone valerate aerosol given in doses of 100 μg into each nostril twice daily was compared with a placebo in a double-blind, cross-over trial involving thirty patients with seasonal rhinitis. Patients recorded symptoms of eye irritation and watering, sneezing, rhinorrhoea, and nasal blockage, on a diary card. Analysis of the symptom scores showed that nasal symptoms were significantly better on betamethasone valerate than on placebo (P<0.01) and that nasal blockage in particular was improved (P<0.001). The patients’preference was significantly in favour of the active compound (P < 0.02) and no side-effects were noted. It is concluded that betamethasone valerate offers a safe and effective form of treatment for seasonal rhinitis.

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