Skin test reactivity to dog-derived antigens

Authors

  • I. LUTSKY,

    1. Allergy Section, Departments of Medicine and the Department of Preventive Medicine, The Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Research Service, Wood Veterans Administration Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    • *

      Department of Comparative Medicine, Hebrew University School of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel.

  • J. N. FINK,

    Corresponding author
    1. Allergy Section, Departments of Medicine and the Department of Preventive Medicine, The Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Research Service, Wood Veterans Administration Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
      Dr Jordan N. Fink. Research Service. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Wood, Wisconsin 53193. U.S.A.
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  • J. A. ARKINS,

    1. Allergy Section, Departments of Medicine and the Department of Preventive Medicine, The Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Research Service, Wood Veterans Administration Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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  • R. HOFFMAN,

    1. Allergy Section, Departments of Medicine and the Department of Preventive Medicine, The Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Research Service, Wood Veterans Administration Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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  • MARLENE MOROUSE

    1. Allergy Section, Departments of Medicine and the Department of Preventive Medicine, The Medical College of Wisconsin, and the Research Service, Wood Veterans Administration Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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Dr Jordan N. Fink. Research Service. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Wood, Wisconsin 53193. U.S.A.

Summary

Skin test reactivity to canine antigens was studied by testing atopic patients and veterinarians using a commercially prepared mixed-dog epithelial antigen and breed-specific antigens including dander extracts, serum and urine, obtained from thirty-one different pure-bred dogs. Increased skin test reactivity was noted using breed-specific antigens as compared to the mixed-dog commercial screening extract. Variation in skin test responsivity related to specific breed antigens was also noted. The results suggest that skin tests using canine urine and serum antigens, in addition to the conventional dander antigens, may be useful in the diagnosis of hypersensitivity to dogs.

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