Chronic excretion of enteropathogenic bacteria in the faeces–a possible association with allergy to cows' milk

Authors

  • R. H. WITHRINGTON,

    Corresponding author
    1. Somerset Children's Research Unit, Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Musgrove Park, Taunton, Somerset
      Dr R. H. Withrington, Somerset Children's Research Unit, Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Musgrove Park, Taunton, Somerset TA1 6DA.
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  • J. M. BAYLIS,

    1. Somerset Children's Research Unit, Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Musgrove Park, Taunton, Somerset
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  • D. N. CHALLACOMBE

    1. Somerset Children's Research Unit, Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Musgrove Park, Taunton, Somerset
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Dr R. H. Withrington, Somerset Children's Research Unit, Taunton and Somerset Hospital, Musgrove Park, Taunton, Somerset TA1 6DA.

Summary

Two children with protracted gastrointestinal symptoms were found to be chronically excreting enteropathogenic bacteria in their faeces. Withdrawal of cows' milk protein from their diets resulted in clinical recovery and stool cultures became negative, suggesting that allergy to cows' milk may have contributed to their bacterial carrier state.

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