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Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Oxatomide and exercise-induced asthma in children: the value of serial exercise tests

Authors

  • M. SILVERMAN,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine. Institute of Child Health. Hammersmith Hospital. London
      Dr M. Silverman, Department or Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine. Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road. London W12 0HS.
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  • MARION TOOLEY

    1. Department of Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine. Institute of Child Health. Hammersmith Hospital. London
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Dr M. Silverman, Department or Paediatrics and Neonatal Medicine. Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road. London W12 0HS.

Summary

Two groups of eight asthmatic children carried out serial treadmill exercise tests at 2-hourly intervals, after double-blind premedication with oxatomide (2 mg/kg by mouth), sodium cromoglycate powder (20 mg by inhalation) or matched placebo preparations. The drugs were studied in one group up to 6 hr and in the other group (omitting sodium cromoglycate) from 4 to 10hr after administration. Peak expiratory flow rate was measured before and after exercise to give an index of exercise-induced asthma.

Oxatomide had a slight but significant bronchodilator effect. After a lag period of up to 4 hours, oxatomide exerted a significant protective effect against exercise-induced asthma which lasted until at least 8 hr. At 10 hr after ingestion, the effect had gone. A mean maximum diminution of exercise-induced asthma of 49% was found, in comparison with placebo.

Oral oxatomide after a lag period, exerts a significant protective effect against exercise-induced asthma. The relevance of these observations for the clinical management of asthma remains to be determined.

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