Modulation of Fc receptors of thymus-derived lymphocytes by antigen E in ragweed-sensitive and ragweed non-sensitive subjects

Authors

  • K. S. ONG,

    1. The R.A. Cooke Institute of Allergy, Medical Service, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, U.S.A.
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    • *

      Allergy-Immunology Division, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, College of Medicine, Irvine, California 92717, U.S.A.

  • M. H. GRIECO

    Corresponding author
    1. The R.A. Cooke Institute of Allergy, Medical Service, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, U.S.A.
      Dr Michael H. Grieco, The R. A. Cooke Institute of Allergy, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, 428 West 59th Street, New York, New York 10019, U.S.A
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Dr Michael H. Grieco, The R. A. Cooke Institute of Allergy, St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, 428 West 59th Street, New York, New York 10019, U.S.A

Summary

In ragweed-sensitive and ragweed non-sensitive subjects the proportions of T lymphocytes bearing receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (Tγ) and IgM (Tμ) were examined as obtained from the blood, and after treatment in vitro with ragweed antigen E or concanavalin-A.

The proportion of Tγ and Tμ cells, from the peripheral blood of ragweed-sensitive and ragweed non-sensitive persons, untreated in vitro, were not statistically different. However when T cells from ragweed-sensitive subjects were exposed to ragweed antigen E, the Tμ subpopulation was significantly increased (P < 0.001) without change in the Tγ population. The reverse change occurred when cells of ragweed non-sensitive subjects were treated with antigen E; there was an increase in the Tγ subpopulation (P= 0.01) but no change in number of the Tμ cells. Cells from both the sensitive and non-sensitive groups showed increase in number of Tγ and reduced numbers of Tμ cells when incubated with concanavalin A.

Since Tγ and Tμ cells appear to have a regulatory function on B lymphocyte differentiation and antibody production, the pattern of responses of Tγ and Tμ subpopulations in vitro to antigen E in ragweed-sensitive and ragweed non-sensitive subjects may reflect a difference in the cellular control of the immune response to ragweed antigen E.

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