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Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Mould counts and exacerbations of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

Authors

  • R. C. RADIN,

    1. Section of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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  • P. A. GREENBERGER,

    Corresponding author
    1. Section of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
      Dr Paul A. Greenberger, Department of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611, U.S.A.
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  • R. PATTERSON,

    1. Section of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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  • ANN GHORY

    1. Section of Allergy-Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
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Dr Paul A. Greenberger, Department of Medicine, 303 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611, U.S.A.

Summary

The purpose of this study was to determine whether exacerbations of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) were associated with the total outdoor mould counts in the Chicago area. From 1976–1980, forty-nine flares of ABPA (new pulmonary infiltrate with elevation in total serum IgE) occurred in nineteen patients. Thirty-eight (77.5%) of flares occurred during months June through November in association with increased outdoor mould counts in Chicago. This association confirms earlier observations from the U.K. where during the peak mould season which occurs in winter months, there was an increased number of pulmonary infiltrates and average prednisone doses required in ABPA.

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