Oral tartrazine challenge in childhood asthma: effect on bronchial reactivity

Authors

  • D. HARIPARSAD,

    1. Respiratory Unit, Department of Medicine and Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, Ducane Road, London W12 OHS
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  • N. WILSON,

    1. Respiratory Unit, Department of Medicine and Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, Ducane Road, London W12 OHS
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  • C. DIXON,

    1. Respiratory Unit, Department of Medicine and Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, Ducane Road, London W12 OHS
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  • M SILVERMAN

    Corresponding author
    1. Respiratory Unit, Department of Medicine and Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Royal Postgraduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, Ducane Road, London W12 OHS
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Dr. M. Silverman, Department of Paediatrics & Neonatal Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Ducane Road, London W12 0HS.

Summary

Ten asthmatic children who gave a history of cough or wheeze after orange drinks, were tested for tartrazine sensitivity. On separate days, either oral tartrazine (1 mg) or a placebo capsule were administered double blind. Bronchial reactivity was measured before, 30 and 60 min after ingestion by means of a histamine-inhalation challenge test. There was no change in baseline lung function after tartrazine, but histamine sensitivity (PC20) increased significantly in four of the children. No response was obtained to a larger dose of tartrazine (10 mg) in four of the non-responders. Alteration in the bronchial reactivity after an oral challenge, appears to be a sensitive means of detecting tartrazine sensitivity.

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