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In vitro investigations in asthmatic children undergoing hyposensitization with tyrosine-adsorbed Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigen

Authors

  • M. W. TURNER,

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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  • I. YALCIN,

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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  • J. F. SOOTHILL,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
      J. F. Soothill, Department of Immunology. Institute of Child Health, 30 Guildford Street, London WC1N 1EH.
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  • J. F. PRICE,

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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  • J.O. WARNER,

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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  • E. N. HEY,

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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  • M. D. CHAPMAN,

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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  • T. A. E. PLATTS-MILLS

    1. Department of Immunology, Institute of Child Health, London, The Hospital for Sick Children. Great Ormond Street. London and Division of Immunology. Clinical Research Centre. Northwick Park, Middlesex
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J. F. Soothill, Department of Immunology. Institute of Child Health, 30 Guildford Street, London WC1N 1EH.

Summary

Successful hyposensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus in perennial childhood asthma was associated with a slight mean rise of serum IgG antibody to the mite antigen in contrast to a placebo group in whom this antibody fell slightly. No relationship was detected between the effect on asthma and the magnitude of this change, Nor was there any consistent effect on IgE or IgA antibody.

There was a wide range of total serum IgE and IgE, IgG and IgA antibody to D. pteronyssinus before treatment; this level did not predict the effect of treatment. Some patients lacked IgA antibody.

IgE antibody to timothy grass pollen was raised in some but not others. These levels did not change systematically during the study and improvement occurred in those who had this antibody as well as IgE antibody to D. pteronyssinus.

IgG and IgE antibodies to D. pteronyssinus were significantly correlated in the pre-treatment samples.

Lymphocyte thymidine uptake was lower after 8 weeks of treatment than in the control group, not only after stimulus with D. pteronyssinus antigen, in vitro, but also with antigen from Candida albicans. This was not a serum effect.

The late bronchial provocation response was lost only in those with serum IgA less than the log mean for age.

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