Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Aspergillus fumigatus spore concentration in outside air: Cardiff and St Louis compared

Authors

  • J. MULLINS,

    1. Asthma Research Unit, Sully Hospital, Penarth, South Glamorgan, Wales, and Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
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  • PATRICIA S. HUTCHESON,

    1. Asthma Research Unit, Sully Hospital, Penarth, South Glamorgan, Wales, and Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
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  • R. G. SLAVIN

    Corresponding author
    1. Asthma Research Unit, Sully Hospital, Penarth, South Glamorgan, Wales, and Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.
      Dr Raymond G. Slavin. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine. 1402 South Grand Boulevard, Room R210 Doisy Hall, St Louis, Missouri 63104, U.S.A
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Dr Raymond G. Slavin. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Allergy and Immunology, St Louis University School of Medicine. 1402 South Grand Boulevard, Room R210 Doisy Hall, St Louis, Missouri 63104, U.S.A

Summary

Intermittent sampling of the atmosphere 3 days/week over a 12-month period using Andersen samplers in Cardiff, Wales, U.K. and St Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., indicated average A. fumigatus spore concentrations of 13.5/m3 in St Louis and 11.3/m3 in Cardiff. Both sites showed seasonal variations with highest concentrations during winter.

Ancillary