Baker's asthma

Studies of the cross-antigenicity between different cereal grains

Authors

  • G. BLOCK,

    1. Respiratory Division. Vancouver General Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
    • *

      Dr Block was the recipient of the British Columbia Christmas Seal Fellowship.

  • K. S. TSE,

    1. Respiratory Division. Vancouver General Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • K. KIJEK,

    1. Respiratory Division. Vancouver General Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • H. CHAN,

    1. Respiratory Division. Vancouver General Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Canada
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. CHAN-YEUNG

    Corresponding author
    1. Respiratory Division. Vancouver General Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Canada
      Dr Moira Chan-Yeung. 118-2775 Heather Street. Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5Z 3J5.
    Search for more papers by this author

Dr Moira Chan-Yeung. 118-2775 Heather Street. Vancouver, B.C., Canada V5Z 3J5.

Summary

Specific IgE antibodies were demonstrated in the sera of six bakers with respiratory symptoms of asthma or bronchitis by the radioallergosorbent (RAST) assay. The specificity of the antibodies was found to be directed not only against the common flours (rye, wheat) used in the bakeries but also against triticale, barley, oat. corn and rice in some of the bakers. By using the RAST inhibition tests, cross-antigenicity was shown to exist between different cereal grains. The degree of cross-reactivity closely paralleled their taxonomic relationship and appeared to be in the following order of decreasing closeness: wheat, triticale, rye. barley, oat. rice and corn. The allergenic activity in the rye and wheat extracts was found to be distributed among various fractions of different molecular weights.

Ancillary