Allergenicity and cross-reactivity of cat and dog allergenic extracts

Authors

  • Y. BOUTIN,

    1. Unité de Recherche, Inflammation et Immunologie-Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Québec, Canada
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  • H. HÉBERT,

    Corresponding author
    1. Unité de Recherche, Inflammation et Immunologie-Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Québec, Canada
      Jacques Hébert, Unité de Recherche Inflammation et Immunologie-Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, 2703, Boulevard Laurier. Ste-Foy, Québec, GIV 4G2, Canada
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  • E. R. VRANCKEN,

    1. Unité de Recherche, Inflammation et Immunologie-Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Québec, Canada
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  • W. MOURAD

    1. Unité de Recherche, Inflammation et Immunologie-Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, Québec, Canada
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Jacques Hébert, Unité de Recherche Inflammation et Immunologie-Rhumatologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université Laval, 2703, Boulevard Laurier. Ste-Foy, Québec, GIV 4G2, Canada

Summary

This study aims to confirm that cat allergen 1 (CAT-1) is a major allergenic determinant in cat-sensitive patients, and to further define the role of other determinants, as well as to identify the determinants responsible for the cross-reactivity between cat and dog extracts. Firstly, the allergenic determinant with an electrophore-tic mobility of 18 kD (corresponding to CAT-1) is indeed a major allergenic determinant being recognized by the majority (75%) of cat-sensitive subjects. Secondly, the cross-reactivity between the two species was confirmed by RAST inhibition. Cat and dog soluble allergens could inhibit, to variable degrees, the binding of serum IgE from cat- and dog-sensitive patients to insolubilized allergens. Binding of serum IgE from subjects sensitive only to cats was inhibited by cat extracts only. These observations suggest the presence of determinants common to the two sources of extracts, and others specific for each species. These data were confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Indeed, an allergenic determinant of 69 kD was found in both cat and dog extracts. Conversely the allergenic determinants with an electrophoretic mobility of 18 and 32 kD were found only in cat extracts, and those at 22 and 24 kD were dog specific. However, surprisingly, serum IgE antibodies from patients sensitive only to cats reacted on immunoblot differently from those of both cat- and dog-allergic subjects. Indeed, the 18 kD determinant was the only one recognized by serum IgE antibodies from subjects sensitive to cats only, as opposed to the patients allergic to both species: then, the 69 kD determinant was strongly recognized and the 18 kD only slightly recognized. If these observations confirmed that CAT-1 is a major allergen in cat-sensitive subjects, they also showed a different profile of reactivity in patients sensitive to cats only and those sensitive to both cats and dogs, which could have diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

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