Nasal secretory response to allergen provocation

Authors

  • R. A. COHEN,

    1. Departments of Microbiology and Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, West Virginia, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • E. P. BRESTEL

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Microbiology and Medicine, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, West Virginia, U.S.A.
      Eric P. Brestel, MD, Section of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, East Carolina University School of Medicine, Greenville, NC 27858–4354, U.S.A.
    Search for more papers by this author

Eric P. Brestel, MD, Section of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, East Carolina University School of Medicine, Greenville, NC 27858–4354, U.S.A.

Summary

Nasal provocation with ragweed pollen extract was performed on ragweed-sensitive and non-atopic subjects. Nasal lavage fluids were collected 15 min after saline and allergen challenges, and assayed for total protein, albumin, potassium, lysozyme activity and peroxidase activity. There was no statistically significant increase in any of these lavage fluid constituents in non-atopic subjects after allergen provocation, compared with after saline provocation. The lavage fluids of ragweed-sensitive subjects had significant rises in each of the constituents following allergen provocation. This method provides a simple mechanism for quantitating the nasal secretory response to allergen provocation.

Ancillary