The allergens of dog. I. Identification using crossed radio-immunoelectrophoresis

Authors

  • ANNETTE W. FORD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Immunobiology, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, U.K.
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  • LESLEY ALTERMAN,

    1. Division of Immunobiology, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, U.K.
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    • *

      Deparlment of Immunology, Institute of Child Health. 30 Guilford Street. London WCIN lEH. U.K.

  • D. M. KEMENY

    1. Division of Immunobiology, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire, U.K.
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    • Department of Medicine, United Medical & Dental Schools of Guys and St Thomas' Hospitals. St Thomas Street, London SEI 7nH, U.K.


Annette W. Ford, Division of Immunobiology, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Potters Bar, Hertfordshire EN6 3QG, U.K.

Summary

The antigens present in an extract of dog hair and dander were examined by crossed immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and the IgE-binding allergens by crossed radio-immunoelectrophoresis (CRIE), respectively, using sera from 60 British and Finnish animal-allergic subjects. The extract was comprised of a minimum of 28 antigens, 11 of which were common to dog serum. IgE antibody in the sera of the dog-sensitive patients bound to 21 of the 28 antigens at varying frequencies and intensities. Binding of any intensity occurred most frequently to two serum proteins: antigen 23 (IgG) binding IgE in 88% of cases, and antigen 3 (dog serum albumin, DSA) in 77% of cases. Dander antigen 8 bound in 63% and antigen 1 in 42% of the sera. Strong IgE binding, however, was most commonly associated with dander antigen 8 followed by antigens 1 and 23 (IgG) then 3 (DSA). The ranking of the antigens as allergens was similar for the two populations except that DSA was more important for the British than for the Finnish subjects.

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