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Clinical & Experimental Allergy

H1- and H2-antagonists in allergic and pseudoallergic diseases

Authors

  • J. RING,

    Corresponding author
    1. Dermatologische Klinik und Poliklinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München. FRG
      Professor J. Ring, Dermatologische Klinik und Poliklinik der LMU München. Frauenlobstr. 9 -11, D-8000 München 2, FRG.
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  • H. BEHRENDT

    1. Dermatologische Klinik und Poliklinik der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München. FRG
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Professor J. Ring, Dermatologische Klinik und Poliklinik der LMU München. Frauenlobstr. 9 -11, D-8000 München 2, FRG.

Summary

Although known for more than 80 years, histamine still remains a fascinating substance for allergy research. Histamine antagonists have been in clinical use since 1942. The classical H1-antagonists with sedative side-effects have been more or less replaced by newer non-sedating H1-antagonists; the role of H2-receptors in allergic diseases is still controversial. There, are however, increasing reports of beneficial effects of H2-antagonists. mostly in combination with H1-antagonists, in a variety of allergic and pseudoallergic conditions such as chronic urticaria, anaphylactoid reactions due to colloid volume substitutes, opioid analgesics and radiographic contrast media. The combined use of H1- and H2-antagonists might not only act as specific histamine antagonism but exert a mast cell stabilizing effect, as demonstrated in animal experiments and some clinical studies. Future research will show whether the combined use of H1- and H2-anlagonists will become a routine therapeutic procedure in allergy therapy.

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