Clinical & Experimental Allergy

The antigenicity and allergenicity of microparticulated proteins: Simplesse®

Authors

  • H. A. SAMPSON,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy/Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
      Professor H. A. Sampson, Johns Hopkins Hospital, CMSC-1103, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, U.S.A.
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  • S. COOKE

    1. Department of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy/Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A.
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Professor H. A. Sampson, Johns Hopkins Hospital, CMSC-1103, 600 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, U.S.A.

Summary

New technologies are allowing the food industry to develop products from standard foods which may not be recognized in its modified form by food allergic patients. One such product, Simplesse, has been formulated by microparticulation of egg white and/or cows’ milk proteins and is used as a fat substitute in many fat-laden foods. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the process of microparticulation altered the allergenicity/antigenicity of egg white and cows’ milk proteins compared to the starting materials.

Soluble protein fractions of Simplesse and its respective starting materials were compared to egg white, cows’ milk protein, an ultra-filtered egg white/condensed milk mixture, and/or a whey concentrate by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In addition, sera from 16 patients with documented egg and/or cows’ milk hypersensitivity and two controls who were not allergic to egg or milk were used to assess potential allergenicity/antigenicity of these products by immunoblot (Western blot) analysis. There were heterogeneous IgE and IgG binding patterns to the food fractions among these food allergic patients suggesting differing sensitivity patterns among the individuals tested. However, utilizing both SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses, the major allergens in the microparticulated products were the same as those found in the starting materials, egg and cows’ milk. In addition, there was no evidence of‘novel’ protein fractions in the Simplesse test materials compared to the starting materials.

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