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Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Genome-wide linkage analysis of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in a Swedish population

Authors

  • L. M. Bu,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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    • 1Former address: Department of Epidemiology, The Public Health College, Harbin Medical University, China.

  • M. Bradley,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • C. Söderhäll,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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    • 2Present address: Gene Mapping Centre, Max Delbruck Centre (MDC) for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.

  • C. F. Wahlgren,

    1. Dermatology Unit, Department of Medicine Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • I. Kockum,

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • M. Nordenskjöld

    1. Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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Maria Bradley, Department of Dermatology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
E-mail: Maria.Bradley@cmm.ki.se

Summary

Background Allergic rhinoconjunctivitis is a common complex disorder characterized by itching and irritation in the nose, bouts of sneezing, watery rhinorrhoea, nasal congestion and itchy eyes with tears and swelling. Like other atopic disorders such as allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis, the development involves complex interactions of genes and environmental factors.

Objective The purpose of this study was to identify susceptibility loci for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

Methods We conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis using a non-parametric, affected-relative-pair method. The 250 families used were collected originally for an atopic dermatitis linkage study.

Results Three regions showed favour in evidence of linkage to allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: 3q13 (D3S1278: logarithm of odds ratio (LOD)=1.64, P<0.003), 4q34–35 (D4S1652: LOD=1.49, P<0.005) and 18q12 (D18S535: LOD=1.94, P<0.002). In addition, four regions showed weaker evidence in favour of linkage: 6p22–24 (D6S1959: LOD=1.39, P<0.006), 9p11–q12 (D9S1118: LOD=1.15, P<0.02), 9q33.2–34.3 (D9S915: LOD=1.29, P<0.01) and 17q11.2 (D17S1294: LOD=1.13, P<0.02). In single-point analysis, one locus on chromosome 3 close to marker D3S1278 reaches the suggestive level (LOD=2.28, P<6 × 10−4) while one on chromosome 17 close to marker D17S921 almost reaches this level (LOD=2.17, P<8 × 10−4, Table 3).

Table 3.   Single-point linkage analysis for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis
MarkerMap position (cM)*LODP-value
D3S1278129.732.28<6 × 10−4
D3S1267139.121.63<0.004
D4S1625145.981.18<0.01
D4S1652208.071.77<0.003
D6STNFa63.411.14<0.05
D9S25791.871.10<0.05
D17S92136.122.17<8 × 10−4
D17S129450.741.78<0.005
D18S84328.11.23<0.001

Conclusion Our results support the linkage to allergic rhinoconjunctivitis on 3q13, 6p23–p24 and 9q34.3 shown in previous investigations.

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