Get access
Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Do shrimp-allergic individuals tolerate shrimp-derived glucosamine?

Authors

  • J. Villacis,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • 1Present address: 1. 404 Rio Grande, Apt 112, Austin, TX 78701, USA.

  • T. R. Rice,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • 2Present address: Columbia University College of P&S, 50 Haven Avenue, Box 19, New York, NY 10032, USA.

  • L. R. Bucci,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • 3Present address: Weider Nutrition International, 2002 South 5070 West, Salt Lake City, UT 84104, USA.

  • J. M. El-Dahr,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • L. Wild,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. DeMerell,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • D. Soteres,

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • S. B. Lehrer

    1. Tulane University Health Sciences Center Department of Clinical Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, New Orleans, LA, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

Correspondence:
Samuel B. Lehrer, Tulane Health Sciences Center, 1700 Perdido Street (SL-57), New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
E-mail: sblehrer@gmail.com

Summary

Background There is concern that shrimp-allergic individuals may react to glucosamine-containing products as shrimp shells are a major source of glucosamine used for human consumption.

Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether shrimp-allergic individuals can tolerate therapeutic doses of glucosamine.

Methods Subjects with a history of shrimp allergy were recruited and tested for both shrimp reactivity via a prick skin test and shrimp-specific IgE by an ImmunoCAP assay. Fifteen subjects with positive skin tests to shrimp and an ImmunoCAP class level of two or greater were selected for a double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) using glucosamine-chondroitin tablets containing 1500 mg of synthetically produced (control) or shrimp-derived glucosamine. Immediate reactions, including changes in peak flow and blood pressure, and delayed reactions (up to 24 h post-challenge) via questionnaire were noted and assessed.

Results All subjects tolerated 1500 mg of both shrimp-derived or synthetic glucosamine without incident of an immediate hypersensitivity response. Peak flows and blood pressures remained constant, and no subject had symptoms of a delayed reaction 24 h later.

Conclusion This study demonstrates that glucosamine supplements from specific manufacturers do not contain clinically relevant levels of shrimp allergen and therefore appear to pose no threat to shrimp-allergic individuals.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary