Cat sensitization according to cat window of exposure in adult asthmatics

Authors


  • EGEA cooperative group: Coordination: F. Kauffmann; F. Demenais (genetics); I. Pin (clinical aspects); Respiratory epidemiology: Inserm U 700, Paris M. Korobaeff (EGEA1), F. Neukirch (EGEA1); Inserm U 707, Paris: I. Annesi-Maesano; Inserm U 780, Villejuif: F. Kauffmann, N. Le Moual, R. Nadif, MP. Oryszczyn; Inserm U 823, Grenoble: V. Siroux; Genetics: Inserm U 393, Paris: J. Feingold; Inserm U 535, Villejuif: MH. Dizier; Inserm U 946, Paris: E. Bouzigon, F. Demenais; CNG, Evry: I. Gut, M. Lathrop; Clinical centers: Grenoble: I. Pin, C. Pison; Lyon: D. Ecochard (EGEA1), F. Gormand, Y. Pacheco; Marseille: D. Charpin (EGEA1), D. Vervloet; Montpellier: J. Bousquet; Paris Cochin: A. Lockhart (EGEA1), R. Matran (now in Lille); Paris Necker: E. Paty, P. Scheinmann; Paris-Trousseau: A. Grimfeld, J. Just; Data and quality management: Inserm ex-U155 (EGEA1): J. Hochez; Inserm U 780, Villejuif: N. Le Moual, C. Ravault; Inserm U 946: N. Chateigner; Grenoble: J. Ferran.

Correspondence:
F. Kauffmann, INSERM U780, 16 avenue Paul Vaillant Couturier, 94807 Villejuif Cedex, France.
E-mail: francine.kauffmann@inserm.fr

Summary

Background In adults, there is limited information on tolerance to cat, which may be reflected by high IgG4 without IgE sensitization. Early exposure to cat may play a critical role.

Objective The aim was to assess among adults the association of Fel d 1 IgG4, Fel d 1 IgE, skin prick test (SPT) response to cat and pet-related symptoms in relation to exposure to cat considering the period of exposure.

Methods SPT response to cat, specific IgE and IgG4 to Fel d 1 were assessed in 167 asthmatics recruited in chest clinics (40 years of age in average) from the French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Childhood and/or current exposure to cat were studied retrospectively.

Results IgG4 was higher in relation to current cat exposure (0.53 vs. 0.09 ng/mL; P<0.001) and higher in women than in men. The period of cat exposure was significantly related to Fel d 1 IgE, the IgE/IgG4 pattern and cat weal size. The lowest values of Fel d 1 IgE, cat weal size, pet-related nasal or respiratory symptoms were observed in those with both childhood and current exposure as well as the highest proportion of the IgE/IgG4+ pattern observed in 1.4%, 4.0%, 38.1% and 12.5% of those with −/−, +/−, +/+, −/+ childhood/current exposure, respectively.

Conclusions Adult asthmatics exposed to cats since childhood present an immunologic pattern with high IgG4 and low IgE. Continuous exposure may maintain a state of immunological tolerance to cat.

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