Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Is intrinsic asthma synonymous with infection?

Authors

  • P. E. Dahlberg,

    1. Section of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA
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  • W. W. Busse

    1. Section of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA
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Correspondence:
William W. Busse, Section of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, CSC J5/219, MC 2454 Madison, WI 53792, USA.
E-mail: wwb@medicine.wisc.edu

Summary

Rackemann described the ‘intrinsic asthma’ population over 50 years ago as a unique subgroup that was characterized by onset of progressive loss of lung function beginning later in life, possibly after a respiratory infection. It has also been associated with a female predominance, aspirin-sensitive bronchospasm, and nasal polyposis. While the aetiology is not understood, we propose that persistent respiratory infections play a central role in the development of intrinsic asthma.

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