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Conjugated linoleic acid improves airway hyper-reactivity in overweight mild asthmatics

Authors

  • R. MacRedmond,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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    • *These authors contributed equally to the work and should be considered co-first authors.

  • G. Singhera,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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    • *These authors contributed equally to the work and should be considered co-first authors.

  • S. Attridge,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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  • M. Bahzad,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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  • C. Fava,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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  • Y. Lai,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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  • T. S. Hallstrand,

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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  • D. R. Dorscheid

    1. Providence Healthcare Heart+Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
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Correspondence:
Dr R. MacRedmond, The James Hogg iCAPTURE Centre for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, St Paul's Hospital, 1082 Burrard St, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1Y6, Canada. E-mail: rmacredmond@mrl.ubc.ca

Summary

Background Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are naturally occurring fatty acids that have multiple biological properties including the regulation of metabolic, proliferative and immune processes.

Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of CLA as a dietary supplement in mild asthma.

Methods This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Twenty-eight adult subjects (aged 19–40 years) with mild asthma (FEV1>70% predicted) were randomized to CLA 4.5 g/day or placebo for 12 weeks in addition to usual treatment. On average, subjects were overweight with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 27.9 kg/m2.

Results Subjects in the CLA group had a significant improvement in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) at week 12 compared with week 0 [PC20 6.6 (2.1) mg/mL vs. 2.2 (0.7) mg/mL; P<0.05]. The CLA group had a significant reduction in weight and BMI compared with placebo and this was associated with a reduction in leptin/adiponectin ratio. There were no differences in systemic cytokine levels, induced sputum cell counts, quality-of-life scores or adverse events.

Conclusions CLA treatment as an adjunct to usual care in overweight mild asthmatics was well tolerated and was associated with improvements in AHR and BMI.

Cite this as: R. MacRedmond, G. Singhera, S. Attridge, M. Bahzad, C. Fava, Y. Lai, T. S. Hallstrand and D. R. Dorscheid, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2010 (40) 1071–1078.

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