Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Influenza immunization in egg allergy: an update for the 2011–2012 season

Authors

  • M. Erlewyn-Lajeunesse,

    Corresponding author
    1. Infection Inflammation and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
    • Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton, UK
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  • J. S. A. Lucas,

    1. Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust, Southampton, UK
    2. Infection Inflammation and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
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  • J. O. Warner

    1. Imperial College and Biomedical Research Centre, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum Volume 42, Issue 1, 168, Article first published online: 27 December 2011

Correspondence:

Dr M. Lajeunesse, The Children's Allergy Clinic, Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust,

Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.

E-mail: mich.lajeunesse@soton.ac.uk

Summary

Flu vaccines contain detectable amounts of egg protein, which may pose a risk to egg-allergic individuals. The 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic required mass vaccination in many countries, and the safety of flu immunization in egg allergy became of increasing public health importance. This article reviews recent literature and provides an updated guideline for immunization during the 2011–2012 flu season. Recent experience suggests that some vaccines with very low ovalbumin concentrations may be safe for use in primary care in carefully assessed low-risk individuals.

Cite this as: M. Erlewyn-Lajeunesse, J. S. A. Lucas and J. O. Warner, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2011 (41) 1367-1370.

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