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Clinical & Experimental Allergy

Developments in the field of allergy in 2010 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy

Authors



A. J. Wardlaw, Department of Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Institute for Lung Health, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. E-mail: aw24@leicester.ac.uk

Summary

In 2010 over 200 articles were published in Clinical and Experimental Allergy including editorials, reviews, opinion articles, letters, book reviews and of course at the heart of the journal, papers containing original data which have moved the field of allergy forward on a number of fronts. For the third year running the editors felt it would be of value to summarize the key messages contained in these papers as a snapshot of where the cutting edge of research into allergic disease is leading. We have broadly followed the sections of the journal, although this year the mechanistic articles are grouped together and the studies involving experimental models of disease are discussed throughout the paper. In the field of asthma and rhinitis phenotypes and biomarkers continue to a major pre-occupation of our authors. There is continued interest in mechanisms of inflammation and disordered lung function with the mouse model of asthma continuing to offer new insights. There is also a steady flow of papers investigating new therapies, including those derived from plants and herbs, although many are mechanistic with too few high quality clinical trials. The mechanisms involved in allergic disease are well covered with many strong papers using clinical material to ask relevant questions. Pro-pre and snybiotics continue to be of major interest to our authors and this remains a controversial and complicated field. The discipline of epidemiology has retained its interest in risk factors for the development of allergic disease with a view to refining and debating the reasons for the allergy epidemic. There is continued interest in the relationship between helminthic disease and allergy with a new twist in 2010 involving studies using infection with helminths as a potential treatment. The genetics of allergic disease continues to be very productive, although the field has moved on from only investigating single nucleotide polymorphisms of candidate genes to Genome Wide Association Studies and an increasing and welcome emphasis on gene–environment interactions. In the field of clinical allergy there is steady flow of papers describing patterns of drug allergy with renewed interest in reactions to contrast media, but food allergy is the major area of interest in this section of the journal. Lastly in the field of allergens there is a growing interest in the role of component resolved diagnosis in improving the diagnosis and management of allergic disease. Another excellent year, full of fascinating and high quality work, which the journal has been proud to bring to the allergy community.

Cite this as: C. H. Katelaris, A. Linneberg, A. Magnan, W. R. Thomas, A. J. Wardlaw and P. Wark, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 2011 (41) 1690–1710.

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