Current treatment of severe asthma

Authors


Correspondence:

Simone Hashimoto, Department of Respiratory Medicine, F5-260, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

E-mail: s.hashimoto@amc.nl

Summary

Severe asthma is considered a heterogeneous disease in which a variety of clinical, physiological and inflammatory markers determine disease severity. Pivotal studies in the last 5 years have led to substantial progress in many areas, ranging from a more accurate definition of truly severe, refractory asthma, to classification of the disease into distinct clinical phenotypes, and introduction of new therapies. This review focuses on three common clinical phenotypes of severe asthma in adults (early onset severe allergic asthma, late onset non-atopic eosinophilic asthma, late onset non-eosinophilic asthma with obesity), and provides an overview of recent developments regarding treatment options that are best suited for each of these phenotypes.

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