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A case of agminated lentiginosis with multiple café-au-lait macules

Authors

  • J. H. Lee,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Eulji Medical Centre, Eulji University, Seoul, Korea; and Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chungang University, Korea
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  • S. E. Kim,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Eulji Medical Centre, Eulji University, Seoul, Korea; and Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chungang University, Korea
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  • K. Park,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Eulji Medical Centre, Eulji University, Seoul, Korea; and Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chungang University, Korea
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  • S. J. Son,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Eulji Medical Centre, Eulji University, Seoul, Korea; and Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chungang University, Korea
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  • K. Y. Song

    1. Department of Dermatology, Eulji Medical Centre, Eulji University, Seoul, Korea; and Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Chungang University, Korea
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  • Conflict of interest: none declared.

Dr Sook-ja Son, Department of Dermatology, Eulji University, Eulji Medical Centre, 280-1 Hagye, 1-dong Nowon-gu Seoul 139-711, Korea.
E-mail: ssjmdderma@eulji.ac.kr

Summary

Agminated lentiginosis is an unusual pigmentary disorder, characterized by numerous lentigines grouped within an area of normal skin. The pigmented macules are often in a segmental distribution within a sharp demarcation at the midline. We encountered a 28-year-old woman with an unusual combination of multiple café-au-lait macules and diffuse numerous lentigines involving the right cheek and ipsilateral upper thorax with sharp demarcation at the midline. The multiple lentigines extended bilaterally over the back in a peppered distribution. There were 21 café-au-lait macules on both arms, and the trunk and buttocks; however, there were no Lisch nodules, neurofibromas, or any other clinical manifestations for neurofibromatosis. Histopathology of a macule revealed the features of lentigo.

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