Translational Mini-Review Series on Th17 Cells: Development of mouse and human T helper 17 cells

Authors


  • Guest Editor: Leonie Taams

Graham Lord, Department of Nephrology and Transplantation, King's College London, London SE1 9RT, UK.
E-mail: graham.lord@kcl.ac.uk

Abstract

OTHER ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON Th17 CELLS
Function and regulation of human T helper 17 cells in health and disease. Clin Exp Immunol 2009; doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2009.04037.x
Induction of interleukin-17 production by regulatory T cells. Clin Exp Immunol 2009; doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2009.04038.x
Are T helper 17 cells really pathogenic in autoimmunity? Clin Exp Immunol 2009; doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2009.04039.x
CD4+ T helper cells: functional plasticity and differential sensitivity to regulatory T cell-mediated regulation. Clin Exp Immunol 2009; doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2009.04040.x

Summary

There has been a considerable amount of interest in the immunological community about new phenotypic subsets of CD4+ T cells, particularly cells that produce the cytokine interleukin (IL)-17 [named T helper type 17 (Th17) cells]. While the initial discovery of Th17 cells and the pathways that controlled their development was in the mouse, recent attention has shifted to the existence of these cells and the relevant upstream cytokine signals in humans. While it is clear that CD4+ T cells producing IL-17 exist in vivo, their relevance to disease pathogenesis is only just being understood. In this paper, we review the data regarding the generation of human Th17 cells in vitro and the evidence that this effector population is important in human disease states.

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