Infant CD4 C868T polymorphism is associated with increased human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) acquisition

Authors


Robert Y. Choi, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359909, Seattle, WA 98104, USA.
E-mail: ryc@u.washington.edu

Summary

The C868T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the CD4 receptor encodes an amino acid change that could alter its structure and influence human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection risk. HIV-1-infected pregnant women in Nairobi were followed with their infants for 1 year postpartum. Among 131 infants, those with the 868T allele were more likely than wild-type infants to acquire HIV-1 overall [hazard ratio (HR) = 1·92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·05, 3·50, P = 0·03; adjusted HR = 2·03, 95% CI 1·03, 3·98, P = 0·04], after adjusting for maternal viral load. This SNP (an allele frequency of ∼15% in our cohort) was associated with increased susceptibility to mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission, consistent with a previous study on this polymorphism among Nairobi sex workers.

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