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Keywords:

  • CD147;
  • cyclophilin;
  • inflammation;
  • receptor;
  • structure

Summary

CD147 is a widely expressed plasma membrane protein that has been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological activities. It is best known for its ability to function as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (hence the other name for this protein, EMMPRIN), but has also been shown to regulate lymphocyte responsiveness, monocarboxylate transporter expression and spermatogenesis. These functions reflect multiple interacting partners of CD147. Among these CD147-interacting proteins cyclophilins represent a particularly interesting class, both in terms of structural considerations and potential medical implications. CD147 has been shown to function as a signalling receptor for extracellular cyclophilins A and B and to mediate chemotactic activity of cyclophilins towards a variety of immune cells. Recent studies using in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated a role for cyclophilin–CD147 interactions in the regulation of inflammatory responses in a number of diseases, including acute lung inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease. Agents targeting either CD147 or cyclophilin activity showed significant anti-inflammatory effects in experimental models, suggesting CD147–cyclophilin interactions may be a good target for new anti-inflammatory therapeutics. Here, we review the recent literature on different aspects of cyclophilin–CD147 interactions and their role in inflammatory diseases.