Toll-like receptor 4 signalling attenuates experimental allergic conjunctivitis

Authors

  • S.-H. Chung,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital
    2. Laboratory of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Korean Eye Tissue and Gene Bank Related to Blindness, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul,
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  • S. H. Choi,

    1. Laboratory of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Korean Eye Tissue and Gene Bank Related to Blindness, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul,
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  • K. J. Cho,

    1. Department of Ophthalmology, Dankook University Hospital, Chunahn, Korea
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  • C.-K. Joo

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital
    2. Laboratory of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Korean Eye Tissue and Gene Bank Related to Blindness, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul,
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C.-K. Joo, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, #505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-Gu, Seoul, 137-040, Korea.
E-mail: ckjoo@catholic.ac.kr

Summary

Allergic conjunctivitis from an allergen-driven T helper type 2 (Th2) response is characterized by conjunctival eosinophilic infiltration. Association between signalling through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) and adaptive immune responses has been observed in allergic airway disease. We examined whether administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a prototypic bacterial product that activates immune cells via TLR-4, could affect the development of allergic conjunctivitis and modify the immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) allergen in an experimental allergic conjunctivitis (EAC) model. Mice were challenged with two doses of OVA via conjunctival sac after systemic challenge with OVA in alum. Several indicators for allergy were evaluated in wild-type and TLR-4−/− mice with or without adding of different doses of LPS into OVA in alum. Mice challenged with OVA via conjunctival sac following systemic challenge with OVA in alum had severe allergic conjunctivitis. Of interest, LPS administration markedly suppressed immunoglobulin (Ig)E-mediated and eosinophil-dependent conjunctival inflammation. In addition, mice sensitized with OVA plus LPS had less interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and eotaxin secretion than mice sensitized with OVA only. The suppression of allergic response by LPS administration was due to Th1 shift. In contrast, the presence of LPS during sensitization with OVA had no effect on severity of allergic conjunctivitis and Th2 responses in TLR4-4−/− mice. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that LPS suppresses Th2 responses via the TLR-4-dependent pathway in the EAC model.

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