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Keywords:

  • B cell;
  • haematopoietic stem cell transplantation;
  • lymphocyte development

OTHER ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON B CELL SUBSETS IN DISEASE

B cells in multiple sclerosis: drivers of disease pathogenesis and Trojan horse for Epstein—Barr virus entry to the central nervous system? Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 1–6. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 2012, 167: 7–14.

Summary

Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an immunological treatment that has been used for more than 40 years to cure a variety of diseases. The procedure is associated with serious side effects, due to the severe impairment of the immune system induced by the treatment. After a conditioning regimen with high-dose chemotherapy, sometimes in combination with total body irradiation, haematopoietic stem cells are transferred from a donor, allowing a donor-derived blood system to form. Here, we discuss the current knowledge of humoral problems and B cell development after HSCT, and relate these to the current understanding of human peripheral B cell development. We describe how these studies have aided the identification of subsets of transitional B cells and also a robust memory B cell phenotype.