Heat shock protein bystander antigens for peptide immunotherapy in autoimmune disease

Authors

  • E. Zonneveld-Huijssoon,

    1. Department of Pediatric Immunology, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Intervention, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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  • S. Albani,

    1. EUREKA Institute for Translational Medicine, Siracusa, Italy
    2. Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, Translational Research Laboratory, Inflammatory and Infectious Disease Center, La Jolla, CA, USA
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  • B. J. Prakken,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatric Immunology, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Intervention, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
    2. EUREKA Institute for Translational Medicine, Siracusa, Italy
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  • F. van Wijk

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pediatric Immunology, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Intervention, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands
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F. van Wijk and B. Prakken, Department of Pediatric Immunology, KC.01·069·0, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Location Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Lundlaan 6/PO Box 85090, 3584 EA/3508 AB Utrecht, the Netherlands. E-mail: f.vanwijk@umcutrecht.nl; b.prakken@umcutrecht.nl

Summary

Mucosal administration of an antigen eliciting bystander suppression at the site of inflammation results in effective antigen-specific immunotherapy for autoimmune diseases. Heat shock proteins are bystander antigens that are effective in peptide-specific immunotherapy in both experimental and human autoimmune disease. The efficacy of preventive peptide immunotherapy is increased by enhancing peptide-specific immune responses with proinflammatory agents. Combining peptide-specific immunotherapy with general suppression of inflammation may improve its therapeutic effect.

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