Clinical Endocrinology

Pituitary responsiveness after administration of a GnRH agonist depot formulation: Decapeptyl CR

Authors

  • F. J. Broekmans,

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vrije Universiteit, The Netherlands
      F. J. Broekmans, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vrije Universiteit, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • R. E. Bernardus,

    1. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vrije Universiteit, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • A. Broeders,

    1. Ferring AB, Malmö, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • G. Berkhout,

    1. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vrije Universiteit, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author
  • J. Schoemaker

    1. Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vrije Universiteit, The Netherlands
    Search for more papers by this author

F. J. Broekmans, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vrije Universiteit, PO Box 7057, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Summary

OBJECTIVE This study was focused on the pattern of LH release from the pituitary during the initial response to high dose GnRH agonist administration. Secondly, the pattern of LH release and the pituitary responsiveness to physiological and pharmacological stimulation during long-term pituitary suppression by a high dose GnRH agonist was studied. In addition, the relation between serum agonist levels and pituitary function and responsiveness was investigated.

DESIGN oTrp'GnRH in microcapsules (Decapeptyl CR) was administered i.m. to 12 women on the third day of the cycle. High-rate blood sampling was carried out during the first 48 hours after the injection. Secondly, high-rate blood sampling for 6 hours and a GnRH challenge were performed before and weekly after administration, from week 4 till week 9. All samples were assayed for LH and FSH. LH patterns were analysed by applying a computerized pulse detection program. In the second or third week an oestradiol benzoate test was performed. Finally, trip-torelin levels were measured before and weekly after administration.

PATIENTS Twelve patients, suffering from tubal infertility and recruited from the waiting list for in-vitro fertilization/ embryo transfer (IVF/ET) participated in the study.

RESULTS During the first 48-hour period, LH and FSH levels demonstrated a rapid rise to peak values after 4 hours, subsequently declining to nearly normal levels. E2 rose to peak values at 12 hours and returned to the follicular range thereafter. LH pulse patterns showed a rapid increase in pulse intervals leading to a near absence of LH pulses at the end of the 48-hour period.

From the fourth till the seventh week after agonist administration, LH pulse patterns showed a markedly increased pulse interval, decreased pulse amplitude, and a severely decreased mean LH level. In the same period, LH responses to GnRH were severely blunted or absent. Restoration of the pre-injection LH pulse pattern and the LH response to GnRH was observed during the eighth and ninth week. Oestradiol benzoate challenges showed an E2 rise to preovulatory levels in response to the injections. However, no changes were observed in LH and FSH concentrations. Triptorelin levels showed a peak within 48 hours and gradual decline towards pretreatment values in week eight.

conclusions It is concluded from the study, that after administration of triptorelin depot in the early follicular phase, desensitization of the pituitary starts to develop within 24 hours. Pituitary responsiveness is completely absent in the second week and continues to exist until the eighth week after injection, when the agonist has disappeared from the circulation. These findings suggest profound alterations in GnRH receptor availability and post-receptor pathways, that prevent the pituitary from responding to physiological stimuli.

Ancillary