Recombinant human growth hormone therapy does not increase microalbuminuria in children with short stature

Authors

  • Daniel Levine,

    1. Divisions of Pediatric Endocrinology and Nephrology The Schneider Children's Hospital of Long Island Jewish Medical Center, The Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA
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  • Paula Kreitzer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Divisions of Pediatric Endocrinology and Nephrology The Schneider Children's Hospital of Long Island Jewish Medical Center, The Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA
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  • Samuel Freedman,

    1. Divisions of Pediatric Endocrinology and Nephrology The Schneider Children's Hospital of Long Island Jewish Medical Center, The Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA
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  • Howard Trachtman

    1. Divisions of Pediatric Endocrinology and Nephrology The Schneider Children's Hospital of Long Island Jewish Medical Center, The Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA
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Dr Paula Kreitzer, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Schneider Children's Hospital, New Hyde Park, NY 11042, USA.

Summary

OBJECTIVE Concerns have been raised about possible adverse effects of growth hormone on renal function. We measured microalbuminuria as a sensitive index of early glomerular damage in children being treated with recombinant human growth hormone.

DESIGN AND PATIENTS Microalbuminuria was measured in a group of 17 children with short stature being treated with recombinant human growth hormone and in a group of 13 patients with idiopathic short stature not receiving therapy.

MEASUREMENTS Microalbuminuria was measured by a commercially available ELISA and urinary creatinines were determined using a Beckman creatinine analyser.

RESULTS The level of microalbuminuria was 0 484 ± 0 275 g albumin/mol creatinine (mean ± SD) in the patients receiving growth hormone and 0 681 ±0 574 g albumin/mol creatinine in the untreated controls. There was no statistically significant difference between these values.

CONCLUSIONS Treatment with recombinant human growth hormone does not cause an increase in microalbuminuria in children with normal renal function. This supports the safety of this medication in growth hormone deficient children with normal renal function.

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