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Endogenous sex hormones and C-reactive protein in healthy chinese men

Authors

  • Youjie Zhang,

    1. Institute of Urology and Nephrology, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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    • Youjie Zhang and Yong Gao have contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors.
  • Yong Gao,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
    2. Fudan-VARI Center for Genetic Epidemiology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
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    • Youjie Zhang and Yong Gao have contributed equally to this work and should be considered as co-first authors.
  • Aihua Tan,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Xiaobo Yang,

    1. Department of occupational health and environmental health, School of public health of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning , Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Haiying Zhang,

    1. Department of occupational health and environmental health, School of public health of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning , Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Shijun Zhang,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Chunlei Wu,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Zheng Lu,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Mengjie Wang,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Ming Liao,

    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Xue Qin,

    1. Department of Clinical Laboratory, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Li Li,

    1. Medical Scientific Research Center, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Yanling Hu,

    1. Medical Scientific Research Center, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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  • Zengnan Mo

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
    • Institute of Urology and Nephrology, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China
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Correspondence: Zengnan Mo, Institute of Urology and Nephrology, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, 22 Shuangyong Road, 530021 Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. Tel.: 86 0771 5353342; Fax: 86 0771 5353342; E-mail: zengnanmo@hotmail.com

Summary

Objective

To examine the association of endogenous sex hormones and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) with C-reactive protein (CRP) in Chinese men.

Design and participants

The study population comprised 1989 men at baseline recruitment of a population-based cohort in China. Participant information on risk factors was collected by a face-to-face interview and clinical examination. All subjects in the study were without taking any kind of medication for anti-inflammation purpose or treatment of hypogonadism and with CRP value less than 10 mg/l. Data were analysed using linear regression analyses.

Results

Higher levels of total testosterone (TT, β = −0·114, 95%CI, −0·162 to −0·065), free testosterone (β = −0·059, 95%CI, −0·106 to −0·012) and SHBG (β = −0·116, 95%CI, −0·169 to −0·063) were statistically significantly related to lower levels of CRP, after adjustment for age, waist circumference (WC), triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting glucose, insulin, smoking status, hypertension, diabetes and family history of hypertension or diabetes. In the subgroup of men with body mass index ≥ 27·5 kg/m2 or with metabolic syndrome, findings for TT and SHBG were more pronounced, whereas the associations of TT with CRP were attenuated and nonstatistically significant among subjects with WC ≥ 90 cm or with insulin resistance. No associations were observed between estradiol, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and CRP.

Conclusions

We have confirmed the association of androgens with reduced inflammation as measured by CRP in Chinese men. This is independent of conventional cardiovascular risk factors and is explained in part by markers of central obesity and insulin resistance, rather than metabolic syndrome.

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