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Post-ingestive effects of nectar alkaloids depend on dominance status of bumblebees

Authors

  • JESSAMYN S. MANSON,

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    1. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
      Jessamyn S. Manson, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada. E-mail: jessamyn.manson@utoronto.ca
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  • JAMES D. THOMSON

    1. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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Jessamyn S. Manson, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B2, Canada. E-mail: jessamyn.manson@utoronto.ca

Abstract

Abstract 1. Secondary metabolites have acute or chronic post-ingestive effects on animals, ranging from death to growth inhibition to reduced nutrient assimilation.

2. Although characterised as toxic, the nectar of Gelsemium sempervirens is not lethal to pollinators, even when the concentration of the nectar alkaloid gelsemine is very high. However, little is known about the sublethal costs of nectar alkaloids.

3. Using a microcolony assay and paired worker bumblebees, the present study measured the effects of artificial nectar containing gelsemine on oocyte development. Oocytes are a sensitive indicator of protein utilisation and general metabolic processes. We also calculated carbohydrate concentrations in the haemolymph to examine energetic costs of gelsemine consumption.

4. High concentrations of gelsemine significantly reduced mean oocyte width in subordinate bees, while dominant bees showed only a trend towards oocyte inhibition. Gelsemine consumption did not reduce carbohydrate concentrations in haemolymph.

5. The cost of ingesting gelsemine may be due to direct toxicity of alkaloids or may be an expense associated with detoxifying gelsemine. Detoxification of alkaloids can require reallocation of resources away from essential metabolic functions like reproduction. The risks associated with nectar alkaloid consumption are tied to both the social and nutritional status of the bee.

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