Plant patch structure modifies parasitoid assemblage richness of a specialist herbivore

Authors

  • MARÍA S. FENOGLIO,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centro de Investigaciones Entomológicas de Córdoba, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina
      María S. Fenoglio, Centro de Investigaciones Entomológicas de Córdoba, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET), Avenida Vélez Sarsfield 1611-X5016GCA, Córdoba, Argentina. E-mail: mfenoglio@efn.uncor.edu
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  • ADRIANA SALVO,

    1. Centro de Investigaciones Entomológicas de Córdoba, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina
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  • MARTÍN VIDELA,

    1. Centro de Investigaciones Entomológicas de Córdoba, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina
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  • GRACIELA R. VALLADARES

    1. Centro de Investigaciones Entomológicas de Córdoba, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET), Córdoba, Argentina
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María S. Fenoglio, Centro de Investigaciones Entomológicas de Córdoba, FCEFyN, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal (CONICET), Avenida Vélez Sarsfield 1611-X5016GCA, Córdoba, Argentina. E-mail: mfenoglio@efn.uncor.edu

Abstract

1. The spatial structure of plant patches has been shown to affect host–parasitoid interactions, but its influence on parasitoid diversity remains largely ignored. Here we tested the prediction that parasitoid species richness of the specialist leafminer Liriomyza commelinae increases in larger and less isolated patches of its host plant Commelina erecta. We also explored whether parasitoid abundance and body size affected the occurrence of parasitoid species in local assemblages.

2. A total of 893 naturally established C. erecta patches were sampled on 18 sites around Córdoba city (Argentina). Also, two experiments were performed by creating patches differing in the number of plants and the distance from a parasitoid source. For these tests, plants were infected with the miner in the laboratory prior to placement in the field.

3. Plant patch size, independently of host abundance, positively affected the number of parasitoid species in both survey observations and experimental data. However, plant patch isolation did not influence parasitoid species richness.

4. The probability of finding rare parasitoid species increased with patch size, whereas occupation of isolated patches was independent of dispersal abilities (body size) of parasitoid species.

5. Overall, the results highlight the importance of considering spatial aspects such as the size of plant patches in the study of parasitoid communities.

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